Smart Grid Architectural Model (SGAM)
Smart Grid Architectural Model (SGAM)
technology application

Smart Grid Architectural Model (SGAM)

3
domains
3
stories
4
SDGs
updatedMar 26, 2021
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Urban Stebljaj @ Svetlobne iluzije

A cyber-secured, digitally controlled, AI-powered system that communicates and shares information between energy producers, distributors, and customers, in order to organize and provide high efficiency to end consumers, while increasing reliability and reducing cost.
A cyber-secured, digitally controlled, AI-powered system that communicates and shares information between energy producers, distributors, and customers, in order to organize and provide high efficiency to end consumers, while increasing reliability and reducing cost.

An AI-powered, cyber-secured, digitally controlled system, able to take advantage of telecommunications and sensors to distribute electricity optimally. Smart Grid Architecture Model (SGAM) requires sharing information between energy producers, distributors, and consumers to provide a highly efficient response to supply-demand, using multiple centralized and de-centralized facilities, while also providing end-users with information-based options and granular control.

By employing machine learning, it is possible to collect and analyze real-time data from complex systems with renewable and non-renewable sources, supporting energy-efficient decision-making while maintaining stability. By assimilating historical data on power fluctuations and weak spots, the grid can seamlessly and autonomously respond to significant energy spikes and events. The grid's parameters are automatically adjusted to optimally rebalance the load when adding new energy producers such as solar farms or when consumers plug-in small electric cars.

Gender Equality

Challenges

  • May represent a barrier to people, especially women, who are not used to the required technological literacy, thus possibly resulting in social stigma, embarrassment, shame, etc.

Opportunities

  • As energy access contributes to the overall development of the population, it has spill-over effects on non-targeted gender equality interventions.

Related Content

3 stories
4 organizations
3 technology domains
8 industries
  • Energy
  • Retail & Logistics
  • Mobility
  • Environment & Resources
  • Manufacturing & Production
  • Construction
  • Communications
  • Defense & Security
5 topics
  • Basic Energy Services
  • Decentralization & Local Governance
  • Digital Economy
  • Digital Governance and Society
  • Human Rights
4 SDGs
  • 07 Affordable and Clean Energy
  • 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities
  • 09 Industry, innovation and infrastructure
  • 10 Reduce inequalities